ZzaAddict
Hoekay, I just post random stuff about things and... stuff... that can make me Smile and laugh. So that's it.

If You are friend with Chocolate and Pizza then you are my friend. d-(^u^)z

P.S: Nintendo n' Fantasy Books Rocks!

"LOOK AT THE CAT"

-me every time there is a cat regardless of the situation (via spockular)

the-stoner-sage:

Shoving good vibes in the face to all those negatives

ma6ddy:

OKAY SO YOU GUYS REMEMBER THE POKEMON CEREAL FROM 2000?

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SOMEONE CONTACTED KELLOGG’S LAST YEAR ABOUT BRINGING IT BACK AND THEY REPLIED:

"Unfortunately, consumer demand was not strong enough to support continued production
However, if our continued research indicates a…

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

Clever Clothing Life Hacks Part 1 Here

ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 

Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?

Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.

The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections2009.20.148.

blameaspartame:

earl’s purchase

tiger03lily:

wrapyourlipsaroundmyname:

badgalfaashion:

brainy-beauty:

inmytwistedfairytale:

HE HANDED THAT SHIT TO HIMMMMM

Farrakhan does not fear man. Amen.

DANM!!

I think this make the 10th time ive reblogged this 

amazing

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

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sniperj0e:

the 3D on this thing is unreal

winchesterwrites